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Rules of the Upper Culm Community Land Trust Limited

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This document constitutes the Rules and Articles of Association of the Upper Culm CLT Ltd.

 

 
Rules of
Upper Culm Community Land Trust Limited
31568 R
Registered office: Culm Pyne Barton, Hemyock, Cullompton, Devon, EX15 3UE
(incorporated under the Industrial and Provident Societies Act 1965)
 
 
 
 
Reinvestment Rules - Community Assets Model 2010
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
Rules of Upper Culm Community Land Trust Limited
A       Name, number and main objects____________________________________________________ 1
1       What is the society's name?________________________________________________________ 1
2       What are the society's objects?_____________________________________________________ 1
B       Rights of members of the society____________________________________________________ 1
3       What types of share are there?_____________________________________________________ 1
4       What is the minimum shareholding?_________________________________________________ 2
5       What is the maximum shareholding?_________________________________________________ 2
6       How to become a member of the society?____________________________________________ 2
7       How do members withdraw their shares?_____________________________________________ 3
8       What if a member loses their share certificate?________________________________________ 4
9       Can a member sell their shares?____________________________________________________ 4
10     What are a member's voting rights?_________________________________________________ 4
11     Can members shares in joint names?________________________________________________ 4
12     Can children own shares?_________________________________________________________ 5
13     What happens on death, bankruptcy or mental incapacity________________________________ 5
14     Will members get a windfall if the society converts?_____________________________________ 8
15     Will the society pay interest on shares?_______________________________________________ 9
16     Can members have their shares taken from them?____________________________________ 10
16A   Nominee shareholdings__________________________________________________________ 11
C       Management of the society________________________________________________________ 12
17     The directors___________________________________________________________________ 12
18     Retirement by rotation___________________________________________________________ 14
19     The secretary__________________________________________________________________ 14
20     Co-opted committee members____________________________________________________ 14
21     Board meetings________________________________________________________________ 15
22     Decisions of the board ___________________________________________________________ 15
23     Directors’ interests______________________________________________________________ 15
24     Indemnity for directors___________________________________________________________ 16
25     Audit and accounts______________________________________________________________ 16
26     The seal of the society___________________________________________________________ 17
D       Meetings of members_____________________________________________________________ 17
27     The annual general meeting_______________________________________________________ 17
28     Special general meetings_________________________________________________________ 18
29     Procedure at general meetings____________________________________________________ 18
30     Voting at general meetings________________________________________________________ 19
E       The constitution of the society_____________________________________________________ 20
31     Changes to the rules_____________________________________________________________ 20
32     Winding up the society___________________________________________________________ 20
32A   Restrictions on use _______________________________________________________21
33     Powers_______________________________________________________________________ 22
34     Registered Office_______________________________________________________________ 23
35     The Euro______________________________________________________________________ 23
36     Notices_______________________________________________________________________ 24
37     What words mean - definitions_____________________________________________________ 25
F       Rules to support onlending activities_______________________________________________ 26
38     Money laundering_______________________________________________________________ 26
39     Systems and controls____________________________________________________________ 26
40     Business principles______________________________________________________________ 26
41     Fidelity insurance_______________________________________________________________ 26
42     Accounts______________________________________________________________________ 27
 


Rules of Upper Culm Community Land Trust Limited
__________________________________________________
A               Name, number and main objects
1                What is the society’s name and number?
1.1            The society’s name is Upper Culm Community Land Trust Limited.
1.2            The society’s registered number is 31568 R.
1.3            The society’s registered office is Culm Pyne Barton, Hemyock, Cullompton, Devon, EX15 3UE
2                What are the society’s objects?
2.1            The society aims to:
2.1.1       Maintain or improve the physical, social and economic infrastructure within Hemyock, Clayhidon and their environs;
2.1.2       Advance education (particularly concerning asset based community development and enterprises with a community or environmental focus); and
2.1.3       Provide an opportunity for public-spirited people and organisations to contribute financially to the community, with the expectation of a social dividend, rather than personal financial reward.
2.2            Examples of the ways in which the society may carry out its objects may include:
2.2.1       Providing housing for those in need and help to improve housing standards;
2.2.2       Creating training and employment opportunities by the provision of workspace, buildings or land;
2.2.3       Developing new or existing services to the local community that contribute to the local economy.
2.3            Those objects are carried on for the benefit of the community.
2.4            The society’s members may, subject to the registration of a rule amendment by the Financial Services Authority, change the society’s objects. See rule 31.
__________________________________________________
B               Rights of members of the society
3                What types of share are there?
3.1            All shares in the society are ordinary shares with a nominal value of one pound each. The ‘par’ or ‘capital’ value of shares may be reduced in some circumstances (see rule 16).
3.2            The society may issue some shares as designated for a particular purpose. Those shares may carry a risk or return which is different from that for other shares. (see rule 16.5). However, all shares irrespective of their issue will have the same voting rights.
4                What is the minimum shareholding?
4.1            Members of the society must have a minimum shareholding of five shares.
4.2            Members that withdraw all of their shares will no longer be members of the society.
4.3            A member’s debt due to the society will give the society a lien on the member’s shares. This debt may be offset against the member’s share capital, share interest or loans to the society.
5                What is the maximum shareholding?
5.1            A member’s total shareholding cannot exceed the maximum the law allows. Currently that is £20,000. But that limit does not apply if the member is an industrial and provident society.
5.2            In rule 5.1, a member’s total shareholding includes all shares registered in the member’s name, including (for example):
à                 all shares jointly held with others; and
à                 shares held on behalf of others.
6                How to become a member of the society
6.1            On formation of the society, the subscribers to these rules become members, each holding one share. (This rule does not apply to the society where the society is adopting these rules in substitution for an earlier set of rules).
6.2            The directors of the society will, from time to time, set the procedures and forms to be used for applying for shares and for the minimum allowable shareholding under rule 4.1. Those procedures should include the following:
6.2.1       The directors will obtain legal advice, to confirm that any proposed financial promotion:
6.2.1.1 does not contain any untrue or misleading statement; and
6.2.1.2 gives a reasonable and fair description of the risks associated with holding withdrawable shares in this society; and
6.2.1.3 complies with any voluntary code or guidance which the society may, from time to time, agree.
6.2.2       For this rule, a proposed financial promotion is any document issued by the society to promote the issue of shares (or anything else which might be considered an investment if issued by a company, such as a bond, for example).
6.2.3       For this rule a document also includes ‘non-real time communications’ and ‘real time communications’ (as described in article 7 of the Financial Services and Markets Act 2000 [Financial Promotion] Order 2001; SI 2001/1335), even if it is not in documentary form.
6.3            Members must pay one pound for each share for which they apply.
6.4            When shares are issued, the society will provide a share certificate in respect of those shares. At that time a member’s details will be entered into the society’s register of members.
6.5            The society may operate a share purchase instalments scheme to help members to purchase the minimum shareholding. Some legal restrictions may govern the operation of that scheme.
6.6            The society will take reasonable steps to verify the identification of members. The society will retain a copy of all documents seen to verify the identity of a member.
7                How do members withdraw their shares?
7.1            All shares are withdrawable. When members withdraw shares, the society may return the money paid for them. Subject to rule 16.1 this does not apply if the society has reduced the capital value of shares (by passing a board resolution, under rule 16.4.1). In that case the society will return only the reduced capital value of the shares.
7.2            If shares are withdrawn the society will pay any interest accrued to the date of withdrawal.
7.3            Shares may be withdrawn on 180 days’ notice. All withdrawals shall be in the order in which the notices are received by the society.
7.4            The society may waive that notice period, or accept a shorter notice period. That will be at the sole discretion of the society’s directors and members have no right to insist that the society should waive or reduce the normal notice period.
7.5            Members must return their share certificates to the society 180 days after providing notice of withdrawal.
7.6            When members apply to withdraw shares, they will need to
à                 complete a withdrawal form (as set by the society’s directors);
à                 comply with any procedures the society’s directors may set; and
à                 produce evidence of identity (if not previously provided).
7.7            From time to time, the society may suspend (or limit) a member’s right to withdraw shares.
7.8            There is a minimum number of members. The minimum is currently:
¨                two (if both members are industrial and provident societies) or
¨                three (if any member is not an industrial and provident society).
   If…
the society has no more than the minimum number of members…
   then…
those members can withdraw some of their shares,
 but,
those members cannot withdraw all of their shares.
7.9            Members may end their membership of the society by withdrawing all their shares. Or, if the right to withdraw is suspended by rule 7.7, members may surrender all their shares. On surrender the directors of the society may (but do not have to) pay some or all of the money paid for the shares.
8                 What if a member loses their share certificate?
8.1          The members of the society are those whose names are on the register of members. So, at their discretion, the directors may allow the society to replace a lost or destroyed share certificate. 
8.2          The directors may set conditions for the replacement. Members will have to meet those conditions before the society can issue the replacement.
9               Can a member sell their shares?
9.1          A member cannot transfer any of their shares to any other person.
10           What are a member’s voting rights?
10.1       At the society’s annual general meeting (and other general meetings of the society), each member has one vote. Members will have one vote each irrespective of the number of shares they may hold.
11           Can a member hold shares in joint names?
11.1       A member may hold any shares in their own name. Or they may hold them jointly (with up to three others).
11.2       Suppose a member represents an unincorporated association (perhaps a club or society, for example). The association's shares must be held in the joint names of two or more persons. The association cannot hold shares in its own name (but the holders of its shares may ask the society to note the association's name and address in the society’s register of members).
11.3       For voting and the payment of interest, the joint holders of a share are one shareholder and one member.
11.4       If a member holds a share jointly, the member and the other holders of that share may go to the society’s general meetings (and speak at them). But only one of the holders of that share can vote. If the holders of the share cannot agree between them who is to vote, it will be the person named first (in the society’s register of members).
11.5       Similarly, the society will send correspondence, notices, and the share certificate, only to the person named first (in the society’s register of members), unless that person gives the society different, written, instructions.
11.6       Similarly, the society will pay interest only to the person named first (in the society’s register of members), unless that person gives the society different, written, instructions.
11.7       Unless members give the society different, written, instructions, all joint holders of a share must sign an application to withdraw the share.
 
12           Can children own shares?
12.1       Members must be 16 years old, or older.
12.2       A person under 16 cannot be a member. But a member can hold shares on behalf of somebody who is under 16. The society has to treat those shares as belonging to that member (and not the child), for the purposes of rule 5.1 (which sets the greatest total value of shares a member can have in their name). Following that person’s 16th birthday, they may become a member of the society and those shares can pass on to them.
13           What happens on death, bankruptcy or mental incapacity?
13.1       This rule 13.1 applies on the death of a member holding a share in their own name.
For shareholdings of £5,000 or less:
              If …
          the member has named a person to take the shares on their death (called the member’s nominee),
             …and if…
          ….the shares registered in the member’s name have a total value of £5,000 (or less),
             then…
          the society will transfer the shares to the member’s nominee.
 
For shareholdings greater than £5,000:
   If …
the member has named a person to take the shares on their death (called the member’s nominee),
   …and if…
….the shares registered in the member’s name have a total value of more than £5,000,
    then…
…the society will transfer the shares to the member’s nominee, but only for shares with a total value of £5,000. The society will decide which shares transfer to the member’s nominee. The member’s personal representatives will have to deal with the other remaining shares.
 
 
 For shareholdings where the nominee is younger than 16 (when they could take the shares):
    If …
the member has named a person to take the shares on their death (called the member’s nominee),
    …and if…
…the member’s nominee is younger than 16 (when they could take the shares),
    then…
…the society may treat an adult (the member’s nominee’s mother, father, or guardian, for example) as having the rights of the member’s nominee. The society will then transfer the member’s shares to them. That adult must undertake to hold the shares on trust for the member’s nominee.
For shareholdings where the member has no nominee and the value is £5,000 or less:
     If …
the member has NOT named a person to take the shares on their death,
     …and if…
….the shares registered in the member’s name (and any other interests the member may have with the society) have a total value of £5,000 (or less),
     then…
…the society may (at the society’s discretion) transfer the shares to the person who seems to have the legal right to them (member’s wife, husband, civil partner or children, for example). The society will ask for evidence of their right. The society is unable to transfer the shares to that person if the personal representative has applied for probate or letters of administration.
For shareholdings where the member has no nominee and their personal representatives have applied for probate or letters of administration, and the value is £5,000 or less:
     If …
the member has NOT named a person to take the shares on their death, BUT their personal representatives have applied for probate or letters of administration,
     …and if…
…. the shares registered in the member’s name (and any other interests the member may have with the society) have a total value of £5,000 (or less),
     then…
… the society will transfer the shares to the member’s personal representative. The society must see the probate or letters of administration.
For shareholdings where the member has no nominee and the value is greater than £5,000:
     If …
the member has NOT named a person to take the shares on their death,
     …and if…
… the shares registered in the member’s name have a total value of more than £5,000,
     then…
…the society will transfer the shares to the member’s personal representative. The society must see the probate or letters of administration.
13.2       After the society has transferred the member’s share to their personal representative, the personal representative:
à                 may apply to withdraw the share;
à                 may apply to receive any interest that may become due on the share before they withdraw it;
à                 but cannot exercise any other membership rights for that share. 
13.3       Any other person to whom the society transfers a member’s shares (under rule 13.1) will have all the membership rights previously enjoyed by the member.
13.4       This rule 13.4 applies on the death of a member who held a share jointly with others.
    If…
the member has not given the society written instructions…
   … then…
the society will treat the surviving owner (or owners) as the only (joint) owner of that share.
    If…
the member has given the society written instructions to do so…
   …then…
rule 13.1 tells the society who to register in the member’s place.
13.5       This rule applies to the member’s replacement (the person to whom the society transfers the member’s shares under rules 13.1 or 13.4). Rules 13.1 and 13.4 do not allow the member’s replacement to hold (on their own or jointly, with others) shares with a total value greater than the law allows. See rule 5.1.
13.6       After the society receives written proof that a member is bankrupt, the trustee of their estate may apply to withdraw the share. The trustee may also then apply to receive any interest that may become due on the share before they withdraw it. The trustee cannot exercise any other membership rights for that share. This rule 13.6 applies if the share was in the member’s sole name.
13.7       This rule 13.7 applies when the society receives written proof that a joint holder of a share is bankrupt. The society will then substitute the interest of the trustee of their estate for the name of that joint holder (in the society’s register of members). The trustee will be substituted as the last named person (of the joint holders of that share) registered as holding that share. The society will automatically cancel any written instructions that vary the effect of rules 11.5, 11.6, or 11.7.
13.8       This rule 13.8 applies when a member (or a person claiming through a member) is mentally incapable. The board should treat that individual as mentally incapable when satisfied (after considering medical evidence) that the individual is incapable, through disorder or disability of mind, of managing their own affairs.
13.9       When rule 13.8 applies, the board should deal with the individual’s donee or deputy if:
13.9.1   the individual lacks capacity (as described in the Mental Capacity Act 2005) for the purposes of the Industrial and Provident Societies Act 1965; and
13.9.2    there is, for that individual:
13.9.2.1 a donee of an enduring power of attorney (as described in the Mental Capacity Act 2005); or
13.9.2.2 a donee of a lasting power of attorney (as described in the Mental Capacity Act 2005); or
13.9.2.3 a deputy, appointed by the Court of Protection; and
13.9.3    that donee, or deputy has power for that individual, for the purposes of the Industrial and Provident Societies Act 1965.
13.10    In all other cases when rule 13.8 applies, the board may pay, to any person they judge proper, the value of that individual’s shares, loans and deposits with the society. But first the board must be satisfied that:
13.10.1    no other person has been appointed to administer that individual’s property; and
13.10.2                    it is just and expedient to pay that person.
 
14           Will members get a windfall if the society converts?
14.1       The society may convert itself into a company, amalgamate with another society or company, or transfer its business to another society or company. The society or company (into which the society converts, or with which it amalgamates, or to which it transfers its business) must have objects similar to those of the society. The procedures and conditions for that are in ss50-52 and s54 of the Industrial and Provident Societies Act 1965. 
14.2       Members are not to benefit financially if the society converts, or transfers its business or is wound up (see rule 32.5). The society may make it a condition of membership that members sign a contract with the society prior to becoming a member, in such form as the society’s directors require, by which members give up any personal financial benefit from conversion, or transfer, or winding up. 
The society may also make it a condition that for any members that were not previously subject to such a contract, that such a contract becomes a condition of their ongoing membership, subject to the agreement of members at an AGM and where relevant, the registration with the Financial Services Authority of any related rule amendments.
14.3       Members appoint the society’s secretary as their attorney (for this purpose only and no other). The society’s secretary may sign the contract referred to in rule 14.2 above for members if members do not sign it and return it within 14 days after the society asks them to. That appointment is irrevocable and granted to secure members’ obligation in rule 14.2.
15           Will the society pay interest on shares?
15.1       The society may use its property and profits only to promote its objects. The society will not pay members any dividend, bonus or other share in profits.
15.2       Rule 15.1 does not prevent the society from paying interest on shares. The directors of the society will set the rate of interest (if any). It will be a variable interest rate. Subject to the agreement of members at an AGM, the directors may decide to pay interest to members on their shares by issuing further shares.
15.3       The society will not pay a rate of interest that is higher than needed to fund the society’s activities. In setting the rate, the society’s directors will take particular account of the society’s intention to provide an opportunity for public-spirited people and organisations to contribute financially to the community, with the expectation of a social dividend, rather than personal financial reward.
15.4       The society will calculate the interest on the money paid for the shares (unless their capital value has been written down under rule 16.4.1). While shares are written down under rule 16.4.1 the society will calculate the interest on that written down value.
15.5       Rule 15.1 does not prevent the society from setting aside a reserve fund. The society’s directors are to decide how much is to be transferred to the reserve fund. The reserve fund may be used to meet any contingency which affects the society’s business. But, before the society can use the reserve fund:
15.5.1       the directors have to recommend its use to a general meeting of members; and
15.5.2       the general meeting must approve its use (by a simple majority).
15.6       Rule 15.1 does not prevent the society from paying money to support:
15.6.1       co-operative development; and
15.6.2       educational purposes; and
15.6.3       charitable purposes.
15.7       The directors may propose payments authorised by rule 15.6. But, before the society can make the payment:
15.7.1       the directors have to recommend it to a general meeting of members; and
15.7.2       the general meeting must approve it (by a simple majority).
15.8       Rule 15.1 does not prevent the society from paying (in good faith):
15.8.1   (at a reasonable and proper rate) for services rendered to the society by any of its employees, officers or members, and reimbursement of their expenses; and
15.8.2   (at a reasonable and proper rate) rent, for premises let to the society by any of its employees or officers.
16           Can members have their shares taken from them?
16.1       The society may reduce the value of shares if the society’s liabilities (plus issued share capital) become more than the value of the society’s assets. The circumstances in which this may happen are described below (in rules 16.2 to 16.4). Those rules 16.2 to 16.4 also describe the procedures the society must follow to do that.
16.2       Suppose that the society’s directors believe that the society’s liabilities (plus issued share capital) may be more than the value of the society’s assets. The directors then may instruct accountants to report to them. The accountants may be the society’s auditors, or they may be independent qualified accountants.
16.3       Suppose that the accountants appointed under rule 16.2 report to the directors that the society’s liabilities (plus issued share capital) are more than the value of the society’s assets. The directors may then decide to apportion the excess liabilities (or part of them) among the shareholders. When the excess liabilities are apportioned, the total of the excess will be apportioned among the shareholders in proportion to the total nominal value of shares held by each member. The total nominal value, for these purposes, will be taken to be that at the close of business on the date of the apportionment.
16.4       Suppose that the directors resolve to apportion the society’s excess liabilities in accordance with rule 16.3. The directors must then resolve either:
16.4.1       That the capital value of each share then in issue is reduced accordingly, but:
16.4.1.1 the society shall not reduce the capital value of any share below zero (that is to say a member will not owe any money to the society); and
16.4.1.2 the society may restore the capital value, by a similar procedure to that described in rules 16.2 to 16.4 (but only where the value of the society’s assets is more than the liabilities [plus nominal issued share capital]); and
16.4.1.3 if the society restores the capital value, the society shall not increase it above one pound; and
16.4.1.4 all shares the society may issue later (after the society has reduced the capital value of any shares) are to be issued at par (and for a nominal value of one pound each).
16.5       Rules 16.2 to 16.4 may not apply to assets, liabilities and share capital which are designated to specific purposes in accordance with rule 3.2. Shares may be issued on the bases that:
16.5.1       they are designated to a specific purpose (under rule 3.2); and
16.5.2       the funds for that purpose are treated as separate from the society’s other funds.
16.6       If shares are issued on those bases (in rules 16.5.1 and 16.5.2), this rule 16.6 applies. The assets, liabilities and share capital for each of those purposes (the Special Purpose Funds) are treated separately from the society’s other assets, liabilities and share capital (the General Purpose Funds) in following the procedures in rules 16.2 to 16.4. And the procedures in rules 16.2 to 16.4 do not have to be applied to any of the Special Purpose Funds when they are applied to the General Purpose Funds. Similarly, the procedures in rules 16.2 to 16.4 may be applied to any of the Special Purpose Funds in isolation; they do not have to be applied to any other of the Special Purpose Funds (or the General Purpose Funds) at the same time.
16A    Nominee shareholdings
16A.1   The board may approve a person as an Approved Nominee. The board may impose conditions when it approves an Approved Nominee, and may later vary them and add new conditions. For example, the board may wish to ensure that:
16A.1.1 the Approved Nominee is a fit and proper person to represent members of the society; and
16A.1.2 the Approved Nominee is operating effective identification and money-laundering procedures at least equivalent to those operated by the society; and
16A.1.3 the Approved Nominee will, on request, give full identification information about any member it represents; and
16A.1.4 the Approved Nominee gives prospective members a reasonable and fair description of the risks associated with holding withdrawable shares in this society.
16A.2   The board may not approve more than five Approved Nominees at any time.
16A.3   An Approved Nominee may apply for membership of the society on its own behalf, or on behalf of others. When applying for membership on behalf of another, the Approved Nominee must name that other, and identify the number of shares for which that other is applying.
16A.4   When the board approve an application for shares by an Approved Nominee (acting as such), the society will enter the member in its register of members, and issue the share certificate as: ‘[name of Approved Nominee] re [name of member]’. The society will enter the address of the Approved Nominee as the address of that member for those shares.
16A.5   For the purposes of rules 5.1 and 7.8, each member represented by the Approved Nominee is a separate member and their shareholding through the Approved Nominee is treated as part of their total shareholding. The Approved Nominee itself (if it owns shares other than on behalf of others) is a separate member.
16A.6   For the purposes of rule 7.3, an Approved Nominee may give notice on behalf of a member it represents (but only for those shares registered in its name on behalf of that member).
16A.7   The society will return capital and pay interest payable under rule 15.2 to the Approved Nominee on behalf of the members it represents (but only for those shares registered in its name on behalf of those members).
16A.8   For the purposes of rules 27 and 28, the society need give only one notice to an Approved Nominee, with one set of papers, and that is regarded as good notice of the general meeting, to the Approved Nominee and each member it represents (for all shares owned by that member).
16A.9   At general meetings the Approved Nominee is automatically the proxy of each member it represents, without the need for any further proxy form. In counting for the quorum at a general meeting, each member represented by the Approved Nominee is regarded as present.
16A.10 At general meetings, the Approved Nominee does not have to cast all votes under its control in the same manner. So, for example, some of its block of votes may be cast for a particular resolution, some against, and some might abstain. Nothing in these rules gives any member or officer of the society any right to compel the Approved Nominee to disclose why it has cast the votes under its control in any particular way.
16A.11 An Approved Nominee must give this information to the society on each occasion that it casts any of its block of votes:
16A.11.1 the total number of votes in its block.
16A.11.2 the number of votes it is casting for the motion.
16A.11.3 the number of votes it is casting against the motion.
16A.11.4 the number of abstentions from its block (all members whom it represents, but who are not voting for or against the motion).
16A.11.5 its net vote (the difference between the number of votes it is casting for the motion and the number it is casting against the motion).
16A.12 The size of the block of votes cast by any Approved Nominee is limited. The net vote cast by an Approved Nominee for or against any motion is counted as no more than the lower of:
16A.12.1 That Approved Nominee’s net vote on that motion.
16A.12.2 Such number of votes as constitutes 5% of the total votes cast for and against the motion. In counting the total votes cast for and against the motion the society must count the net vote of each Approved Nominee voting (each limited to 5% of the total). In counting the total votes cast for and against the motion, the society must not count any abstentions.
16A.13 The society may terminate the approval of the Approved Nominee on reasonable notice following failure to comply with any condition applied by the society. The Approved Nominee is then treated as having given notice to withdraw all shares it holds (for itself and on behalf of others).
 
 
C               Management of the society
17           The directors
17.1       The people nominated (as directors) by the subscribers to these rules became the first directors of the society, when it was formed. (This rule does not apply to the society where the society is adopting these rules in substitution for an earlier set of rules).
17.2       The directors:
à                 manage the business of the society;
à                 may (at any board meeting at which there is a quorum) exercise any of the society’s powers;
à                 may delegate any of their powers to a committee (of 2 or more directors);
à                 may delegate any of their powers to a sole director;
à                 may appoint any person to act as the agent of the society (and they may authorise that person to delegate their powers).
17.3       The society has a minimum of two directors (see also rule 17.7). If there is one director, the sole director has authority to appoint a second director.
17.4       The directors on the society’s board are appointed by members at the annual general meeting. All candidates for a board position must find members to act as a proposer and seconder and then declare their intention to stand for the board 14 days before the annual general meeting. Between annual general meetings, the board may appoint a director either:
à                 to fill a vacancy; or
à                 as an additional director.
17.5       Directors appointed by the board must stand down at the end of the next annual general meeting. The members may reappoint them, at that annual general meeting.
17.6       The society will hold a special general meeting within six months after the society is formed. The directors appointed by the subscribers to these rules (see rule 17.1) must stand down at the end of that special general meeting. The members may reappoint them, at that special general meeting. (This rule does not apply to the society where the society is adopting these rules in substitution for an earlier set of rules).
17.7       The members may increase the minimum number of directors (by changing rule 17.3, but any such increase would only take effect once an appropriate rule amendment had been registered by the Financial Services Authority). 
17.8       Directors do not have to be members of the society. Directors may be members of the society. Directors must be individuals
17.9       A director, chief executive or secretary cannot be appointed if they are (and must stand down if they become):
à                 bankrupt; or
à                 convicted of an offence of dishonesty; or
à                 convicted of another offence (which, in the board’s opinion, makes them unsuitable to hold office); or
à                 disqualified from acting as a director (under the Company Directors Disqualification Act 1986); or
 
à                 unable to conduct regulated activities on behalf of another organisation because the Financial Services Authority (FSA) withdraws their approval (under the Financial Services and Markets Act 2000 (FSMA)); or
à                 unable to conduct regulated activities because the FSA makes a prohibition order against them (under FSMA); or
à                 (in the board’s opinion) physically or mentally unable to carry out their duties properly.
17.10    Directors must stand down if:
à                 without good reason and without the board’s permission they fail to attend three board meetings in a row;
à                 the board resolves that they should be removed.
17.11    The society can pay its directors, but only if the members approve the basis for the payments.
17.12    The responsibilities and functions of the board include those of a “committee of management”, as described in the FSA Handbook, and the “society’s committee” as described in the Industrial and Provident Societies Act 1965.
18           Retirement by rotation
18.1       At least one third of the directors appointed by the members must stand down (as well as any directors who must stand down under rule 17.5), at each annual general meeting. The members may reappoint them, at that annual general meeting. If any director is not reappointed, they will stand down at the end of the annual general meeting.
18.2       The directors who stand down, at an annual general meeting, will be those directors who have held office for the longest time (since their appointment, or last reappointment). The chair may decide, by drawing lots, who is to be treated as in office for the longest time, if more than one director was appointed or reappointed on the same day.
19           The secretary
19.1       The board appoints the secretary. The secretary may be a director.
19.2       The board may remove the secretary.
19.3       The secretary is responsible for preparing and sending all returns to be made to the Financial Services Authority.
20           Co-opted committee members
20.1       The board may co-opt committee members.
20.2       The committee members co-opted by the board:
à                 need not be members of the society (but the board may require that they be members of the society);
à                 may attend board meetings (unless the board decide that they may not);
à                 may speak at board meetings (unless the board decide that they may not);
à                 may not vote at board meetings;
à                 must stand down at the next annual general meeting (but the board may reappoint them).
21           Board meetings
21.1       Two directors are a quorum for board meetings (unless the directors decide on a higher number).
21.2       Any director may request the secretary to call a board meeting.
21.3       The secretary must call a board meeting on request from a director.
22           Decisions of the board
22.1       The board may make decisions by a majority vote. The chair has a casting vote if votes are equal.
22.2       The board may appoint any director to chair board meetings generally, or to chair a particular board meeting.
22.3       The board may make any decision by signing a written resolution, rather than at a board meeting. All directors must sign the resolution for it to be effective.
22.4       This rule 22.4 applies to rules 22.3. The directors need sign only a copy of the text of the resolution. They do not each have to sign the same piece of paper.
23           Directors’ interests
23.1       Directors must disclose – to the full board – any material interest they may have in any matter being considered by the board. The director may not then:
à                 be treated as part of the quorum of the meeting discussing that matter; or
à                 vote on that matter.
23.2       Directors may disclose their interest by a general notice giving details of their interest in transactions of a particular nature, or with a particular person.
23.3       For the purposes of rule 23.1, a director need not disclose an interest:
à                 that does not conflict with the interests of the society; or
à                 that arises out of the director’s membership (or proposed membership) of the society; or
à           &